Literary Mama writing about the many faces of motherhood

We’re bombarded by exhortations to live life to the fullest, upbraided for being too conventional or too responsible or not responsible enough, for merely scraping by when we could be thriving.

Mo Duffy Cobb’s Unpacked details the quest of a woman driven to travel by a life unraveled and explores both grief and the possibilities of hope against the backdrop of some of the world’s most beautiful and exotic locations.

We are always parenting on this fine line between giving kids enough structure and letting them make their own decisions. Being exposed to new methods of parenting changed the way I interact with my kids, even Veda, who is just shy of two. The women in the Philippines trusted their process, trusted their family, and trusted their kids. That’s what I try to do, too…

With sticky palms to the ceiling / he offers you an old baby doll, its / yarn hair limp and eyes set back, / “Don’t cry, mama.” / The lawyer says it’s been “interrupted,” / like a phone call you make / on a Saturday to your sister, / as if after a pause, it will continue.


This waiting has offered me much time to think, to mull over the worst that can happen.

People have told me what I stand to gain and lose in becoming a mother. The casualties of motherhood include independence.

In the middle of the night, I check to see if Mom is still breathing.


We have a talk about the birds and the bees. Or rather, I attempt to talk about it.

We're looking at courage in this month's Essential Reading picks.

At the sink you fling your mane of golden hair / over your head, exposing bare shoulders, / one bandaged ...


At home the garden stirs. Kingbirds fight / for scraps off the vine. I bruise / sweet peas urging them / upward ...


But this so-called interruption / is a wall, not a whisper, two / thousand miles deep and wide ...


You shot out of me / like a / champagne cork—like Superman, your // grandmother said. Legs / straddled / open ...


Head rush, toes pinned and needling, someone stood on my cath line until I felt my bladder would bomb apart ...

Wardrop discusses the use of prose in poetry and the influence of classic poets on both her work and parenting.


Duffy Cobb speaks about transparency and rediscovering oneself in the wake of a child's death.

The poems in Life as It are lyric, often abstract, cyclical, and complex; images enter a poem, become fragmented, and reappear in new ways through each section.


Like Elizabeth Gilbert’s best-selling memoir Eat, Pray, Love, Unpacked details the quest of a woman driven to travel by a life unraveled and explores both grief and the possibilities of hope against the backdrop of some of the world’s most beautiful and exotic locations.