Literary Mama writing about the many faces of motherhood
Literary Mama Rewind: Literacy

No comments

Welcome to Literary Mama Rewind! Every few weeks we'll round up some of our favorite essays, stories, poems, columns and reviews from the Literary Mama archives relating to a particular theme. If you can read, you can do anything. This month we are featuring writing that reminds us why we ought read to our children, and the importance that literacy has in our personal lives and in our society. Read on!

Our teenagers are writing and reading, I would posit, more than ever before. It may be reading and writing like we have never seen, but there it is nonetheless.

Where has technology intersected with your parenting? 

Blog Co- Editor, Karna Converse shares, "My daughter loves Angelina and the Princess. When we read this one together, we talk about being responsible for oneself and supporting our friends..."

I admit, Henry David Thoreau's Walden is a tough read for a two-year-old. It's a tough read at any age.

Parents in the US have wondered "why Johnny can't read" for over half a century -- at least since Rudolf Flesch published his inflammatory book by that name in 1955. Like Flesch, parents have pointed to the education system, and almost always found it lacking.

Though I don't do book clubs and my eternal fantasy is several hours alone with a book, I am ever eager to share my reading experiences, whether with friends in conversations, emails, and Facebook posts, with strangers in reviews, or, of course, in this column.

I've been reading aloud to my kids for sixteen years now, give or take. In the early years, I read Mariah picture books and early readers until I memorized them.

As a student, professor, and author on literacy, Fox is an avid proponent of reading aloud to kids.

 


Amanda Jaros is a freelance writer and blogger, focusing on nature and science stories. Her work has appeared in numerous journals and magazines including Terrain.org, Newfound, Life in the Finger Lakes Magazine, Highlights for Children, and Cargo Literary. She holds an MFA in creative nonfiction from Chatham University.


More from




Comments are now closed for this piece.